Biomedical Engineering

Faculty Accolades

Study by UH Researchers Could Help Diabetics Better Monitor Glucose Levels
A device being developed by a team of researchers from the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering could make it unnecessary for more...
Larin

A device being developed by a team of researchers from the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering could make it unnecessary for more than 23 million diabetics to submit to daily finger pricks to test glucose levels in their blood.

The researchers received a three-year, nearly $400,000 National Science Foundation grant this month to explore the development of the implantable device, designed to use optical sensing to continuously monitor glucose levels.

Engineering Organizations Present Professor With High Honors
Two engineering organizations earlier this year presented awards to Kirill V. Larin, assistant professor of biomedical and mechanical engineering,...
Larin

Two engineering organizations earlier this year presented awards to Kirill V. Larin, assistant professor of biomedical and mechanical engineering, for achievements in his biomedical optics and imaging research.

The 2008 Outstanding Young Scientist Award was presented to Larin in February by the Houston Society for Engineering in Medicine and Biology. The award recognized him for significant success in his first five years of research.

Imaging Device To Benefit Patients of In Vitro Fertilization
A professor with the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering is developing an imaging device that could increase the success of patients...
Larin

A professor with the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering is developing an imaging device that could increase the success of patients attempting to have children through in vitro fertilization.

Navy Taps UH Researcher to Develop Diagnostic Tool
For as long as the U.S. Navy has had scuba divers, submarines and airplane pilots, it has had to deal with the effects of decompression sickness....

For as long as the U.S. Navy has had scuba divers, submarines and airplane pilots, it has had to deal with the effects of decompression sickness. This condition, which affects those who experience sudden, drastic changes in the air or water pressure surrounding their bodies, can cause anything from joint pain—better known as the bends—to seizure, stroke, coma, and, in the most extreme cases, death.

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